History

 

Butch.er |ˈboŏ ch ər|
noun
• a person whose trade is cutting up and selling meat in a shop.
ORIGIN Middle English : from an Anglo-Norman French variant of Old French bochier, from boc ‘he-goat,’ probably of the same ultimate origin as buck.

Butch.er.y |ˈboŏ ch ərē|
noun ( pl. -eries)
• the work of slaughtering animals and preparing them for sale as meat.
ORIGIN Middle English (denoting a slaughterhouse or meat market): from Old French boucherie, from bouchier ‘butcher.’

Hoot.en.an.ny |ˈhoōtnˌanē|
noun ( pl. -nies) informal
• an informal gathering with folk music and sometimes dancing.
ORIGIN 1920s (originally U.S., denoting a gadget or [thingamajig] ): of unknown origin.

 

When southern Louisiana was still new, the tradition of a Boucherie must have been as ritual to the first Cajun peoples as Mardi Gras and Jazz fest are to us now.

Communities would gather at the beginning of the more difficult times of year to help one another complete their seasonal stores born out of the feast made possible by the whole of the people gathered. Each family that took part in a Boucherie would take home a portion of the hogs slaughtered during the celebration, and every community that held one did so in turn; ensuring that the rotation of the pigs that made up the celebration could last through the winter.

Today, as in the past, Boucheires are both preformed as traditional intimate family affairs, as well as being the basis for huge festivals and celebrations throughout southern Louisiana.

 

boucherie-sm

 

A que crawl is a romp through BBQ country. I’m not sure if that’s in Webster’s, and I’m pretty sure it’s not in Oxford’s English Dictionary, but it’s what our Chef Nathanial Zimet undertook in his native North Carolina before he returned to New Orleans after the storm.

What he was looking for was the best of what to take back to New Orleans when he opened his custom built, K&B purple mobile food truck, fully equipped with all the luxuries of a kitchen on wheels. He lovingly named the purple truck ‘The Que Crawl’ and with the location of his kitchen being limitless, began to serve not just the people of the crescent city, but the hungriest and most loving; those who seek the music and the after hours.

Nathanial-and-JamesBOUCHERIE – a step deeper into taking more appreciation for the foods and personalities that make the south a culinary destination – is Chef Nathanial Zimet, David Zimet, James Denio and staff, and was born out of everything that led Nathanial to the purple truck: an education in Great Brittain and Australia at Le Cordon Bleu; the restaurant industries of New Orleans, North Carolina and abroad – and all that was learned while feeding the streets of this city.

 

Our cuisine reflects our passions and our purpose – which is fine dining for the people. We smoke, cure, age and prepare all our meats in house – and as do most fine establishments of this city – we purchase from local agriculture and seafood purveyors when available.

Through these small understandings Boucherie embraces the traditions of its namesake, as well as the food that inspired it.